Results

Friday, October 21st. This two week wait had been brutal. I went to the clinic in the morning for the HCG blood draw. I worked from home, canceled as many meetings as I could, and paced my house. I was a giant stress ball of anxiety.

At 1:40pm, my phone buzzed with an incoming call from ACRM. Shaking, I picked it up. It was Dr. Jim Toner. He said, “Well, I have great news. You’re pregnant!” I was floored, pretty much speechless. I managed to get out “Wow, that’s great!” (lame, I’m aware.) Dr. Toner explained that my (HCG) beta score was 600, so there wasn’t even a question about it – definitely pregnant. He congratulated me and asked me to come back on Sunday for my second beta.

I hung up. I put my head on my knees and cried, and thanked God. I was so so so grateful for good news. Everyone says IVF is really a 50-50 chance on average, and I didn’t dare believe we would be in the positive 50%. But the results said we were. Positive. POSITIVE!!!

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Ways to Survive the 2WW

For the last year or so, each month has been roughly divided into two parts. Part A, in which we work on getting pregnant, and Part B, in which we wait with bated breath for the results of our efforts.

As everyone in this infertility boat knows, Part B sucks. That two week wait is horrendous. You hope for the best. You try to manage your expectations. You Google every twinge and yawn. You dream of getting good news, and what you might do with that joy. You count down the days. You’re filled with dread. You’re giddy with excitement. You are waiting, with a capital W.

If you look up “ways to survive the two week wait” online, there’s a popular list that involves ideas like: Look up the meanings of your favorite baby names. Take a walk and plan your stroller route. Clean out your closet so your new maternity clothes have room.

Oof. For someone that’s suffered through almost two years of two week waits and negative news, that’s a tiiiiiiny bit too much of positive thinking for me.

There are also some super sweet ideas about making gratitude daisy chains or a 2WW advent calendar. Those kinds of ideas didn’t appeal to me, though – I think because I was looking for distractions instead of dwelling on the waiting time.

Here are some things I did end up doing while on this IVF 2WW (really more like Tuesday to the following Friday, 10 days).

  1. Read a lot of historical romance novels… yep I said it.
  2. Binge watched a ton of movies and tv shows (Supergirl and Suits – THANK YOU for taking up countless hours of my waiting time)
  3. Listened to a lot of podcasts, especially true crime podcasts… My Favorite Murder made me laugh even on my lowest days
  4. Made up random plans with non-pregnant friends for random days of the week, so I always had something to look forward to
  5. Planned out some fun things to do for the weekend of my first beta test… so if I was pregnant, we could celebrate, and if not, I’d have something to take my mind of off the sadness
  6. (not really cool add) Work… my work has been crazy, so I spent a lot of the 2WW stressed out and anxious about work… at some points work anxiety was eclipsing the 2WW anxiety. I couldn’t decide if that was good or bad!

I think I did pretty well with the 2WW right up until the very end. By the last couple of days, I was tearing my hear out at work, so stressed out about the beta, and just completely out of my mind. But the days passed by, and finally it was Friday – the day of my beta test. Pregnant: YEA OR NAY?

Making the Leap from IUI to IVF

Somewhere in the middle of the 2WW for my 3rd IUI, Joe and I were in the car together when I tearfully turned to him and said, “I’ve decided something. If this current IUI doesn’t work, I don’t think I’m ready for IVF. I’m young, we have a lot of time to have children, and I don’t think I’m ready to subject my body to the invasiveness of an IVF treatment cycle at this point.” I was having a bad day. But I did somewhat mean it.

A few days later, I got my period. Failed IUI, #3. I wasn’t so surprised… but that didn’t mean it didn’t hurt in every way. It was harder than ever not to know what was “wrong,” after so many tries. Still unexplained, this infertility. Was it timing? Was it an undiscovered medical condition? What. Was. The. Problem?!

Back in the 2nd IUI cycle, we had a catch-up meeting with Dr. Fogle to talk through next options past IUI and so I had a general understanding of the physical and financial commitments of IVF, as well as the 6-week time commitment required. I can’t remember the moment I changed my mind and decided to move forward, but our reasons for jumping into IVF were pretty practical:

  1. We weren’t getting any younger, at 32 and 31. Egg reserve and health only diminish with time.
  2. Perhaps the IVF process would help us understand why our bodies hadn’t been working to produce a baby over the last year and a half.
  3. We had already met our insurance deductible for the year, and it was to our benefit to continue with IVF treatment in the same calendar year.
  4. We had also been saving money for a new car, and had money in the bank to write the upfront checks that IVF treatment required (insurance only covered about 70% of costs in our case).
  5. We were ready to see this adventure through…and ready to be parents! We’d come this far… so, we asked ourselves, why not? We didn’t want to live with the regret that we didn’t do all we could.

So, in mid-September, I started back on birth control pills for the first time in almost two years… the beginning of our next adventure.

Waiting For ET: Worse Than The 2WW?

I started this blog last Sunday, in the throes of anxiety between egg retrieval and embryo transfer for my first IVF cycle. Since then, I’ve been trying to describe our infertility struggles from the beginning of the story. But for today’s post, we have to fast forward to the present time, because I just went through the embryo transfer yesterday! I promise we’ll get back to chronological order after this (can’t skip posts on the stim injections, trigger shots, and egg retrieval, after all), but I want to tell you about yesterday’s experience while it was still fresh (there’s a joke in here somewhere…) in my mind.

I was scheduled to have the embryo transfer 5 days after my egg retrieval last Thursday. The five days between egg retrieval and embryo transfer were quite possible the most anxiety-ridden days of this whole treatment process. Some people say that the 2WW with IVF cycles is not as bad, because it’s only ~10 days in reality, but they aren’t counting those 5 days before the transfer! The 5DW should be a thing.

Here’s how they went for me:

On Friday, the embryologist called to let me know that out of 10 retrieved eggs, 8 of them fertilized normally. I thought this was great news! On Saturday and Sunday, I drowned in anxiety, apprehension, and the gut-wrenching fear of the unknown. How were the 8 fertilized eggs doing doing? Would we have any embryos at all to transfer? Would they call us right away with bad news? On Monday, the nurse called to confirm my 9:30 appointment on Tuesday for the embryo transfer. I asked her if she had an updated status on the embryos, but she didn’t… she explained that they still had to develop a full day before they were able to evaluate them for transfer. This made sense, but didn’t help my anxiety. Was there one viable embryo? Were there more? The nurse simply reminded me to drink a ton of water, arrive with a full bladder, and take Xanax and ibuprofen in the morning as prescribed.

The night before the embryo transfer felt a little like Christmas Eve. I was rife with anticipation and thought I’d never be able to get to sleep. I’ve been having problems sleeping in general. I assume it’s from the stress of infertility treatment, but work takes its toll, too. I’ve also been waking up a lot in the middle of the night to use the bathroom. (Thanks, progesterone.) But the next morning, I woke up feeling surprisingly well-rested. In equal parts fear and excitement, I got ready for transfer day at ACRM.